What do you care about?

  • What do you care about?

  • Team XQ

    Organizer
    March 16, 2021 at 10:01 am

    What are you drawn to in the world around you? What do you care about? Explore what matters to you and how you want to express it.

    Make a list of issues that matter to you.

    Identify a few artists whose work really moves you.

    Think about how the styles and mediums those artists use are supporting their expression and how they visually tell stories.

    Discuss here with your fellow creators!

  • Aaron Mitchell

    Member
    April 8, 2021 at 7:41 am
      <li aria-level=”1″>

      What I Am Drawn To In The World

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Creative People

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Activists

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Motivated People

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Nature

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Busy Cities

    <li aria-level=”1″>

    Ten Issues I Care About:

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Police Brutality

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Racial Discrimination

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Economic Racism

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Environmental Racism

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Climate Change

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Affordable Housing

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Women’s Rights

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      LGBTQ Rights

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Fair Wages

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Access to Education

    <li aria-level=”1″>

    Artists I Like (Related to Activism)

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      Fabian Williams

      <li aria-level=”3″>

      How Does He Tell His Story?

      <li aria-level=”4″>

      He uses mixed-media (usually airbrush, spray paint, colored pencils, and graphite) to imbue popular figures in African American culture with a sense of fantasy and power. For instance, he created a painting featuring Malcom X as fictional superhero Magneto, a graphite series that boils down current social issues into equations, and a series of mural paintings that reimagine social justice figures like Hosea Williams as fluorescent, ethereal beings. As with his casting of Malcom X as Magneto, Williams’ work asserts that the brave souls who fight for justice are real-life superheroes and legends.

    <li aria-level=”2″>

    Kadir Nelson

      <li aria-level=”3″>

      How Does He Tell His Story?

      <li aria-level=”4″>

      Nelson primarily uses oil paints to depict the gamut of the African American experience. From the enjoyable yet mundane act of riding an e-scooter to the dignifying yet challenging work of being a young newsy in mid-20th century America, Nadir captures it all with a sense of sincerity and passion. He has created work for a long list of notable clients such as Michael Jackson, Drake, Dreamworks, and The New Yorker. With many of his works being permanent installations at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery and the National Museum of African American History and Culture, he has managed to uplift his people and share diverse depictions of them with millions of others.

      <li aria-level=”4″>

      Kadir Nelson Quote: “I feel that art’s highest function is that of a mirror, reflecting the innermost beauty and divinity of the human spirit; and is most effective when it calls the viewer to remember one’s highest self. I choose subject matter that has emotional and spiritual resonance and focuses on the journey of the hero as it relates to the personal and collective stories of people.“

    <li aria-level=”2″>

    Yehimi Cambrón

      <li aria-level=”3″>

      How Does She Tell Her Story?

      <li aria-level=”4″>

      She primarily creates mural paintings and mixed-media (usually digital art, woodcut, watercolor, and collage) artwork to celebrate the “humanity, resilience, and contributions of immigrants.” In an American society where immigrants are openly disparaged by its most important and powerful figure, Cambrón’s art serves to create a different narrative where the humanity and dignity of immigrants is put front and center. Her work often combines powerful text related to the reality of being an immigrant and images of immigrants and their families. To combat disparaging comments and beliefs, Cambrón urges all citizens to see immigrants and understand their story. You don’t often see positive depictions of immigrants—especially Hispanic immigrants—but Cambrón’s work makes sure that you do.

    <li aria-level=”1″>

    The Story I Want to Tell

      <li aria-level=”2″>

      As a young Black man in America, the specter of police brutality and racism in all its forms has haunted my dreams and ambitions for a long time. With violence and polarization becoming more severe, I worry about my safety and ability to succeed as an artist on a daily basis. With my artwork, I want to communicate a defiance against this fear and a sense of resilience through enjoyment of life and success. I have attended schools where I’ve been the only person of color in a classroom, competition, or club, so I want to empower other young people of color who might encounter exhausting levels of microaggressions every week. Your peers might not understand you, but I do. It’s okay to stand up for your rights and enjoy yourself.

  • Aaron Mitchell

    Member
    April 8, 2021 at 7:47 am

    Please ignore my first reply! I did not know the formatting would look so strange.

    What I Am Drawn To In The World:

    Creative People

    Activists

    Motivated People

    Nature

    Busy Cities

    Ten Issues I Care About:

    Police Brutality

    Racial Discrimination

    Economic Racism

    Environmental Racism

    Climate Change

    Affordable Housing

    Women’s Rights

    LGBTQ Rights

    Fair Wages

    Access to Education

    Artists I Like (Related to Activism):

    Fabian Williams

    How Does He Tell His Story?:

    He uses mixed-media (usually airbrush, spray paint, colored pencils, and graphite) to imbue popular figures in African American culture with a sense of fantasy and power. For instance, he created a painting featuring Malcom X as fictional superhero Magneto, a graphite series that boils down current social issues into equations, and a series of mural paintings that reimagine social justice figures like Hosea Williams as fluorescent, ethereal beings. As with his casting of Malcom X as Magneto, Williams’ work asserts that the brave souls who fight for justice are real-life superheroes and legends.

    Kadir Nelson

    How Does He Tell His Story?:

    Nelson primarily uses oil paints to depict the gamut of the African American experience. From the enjoyable yet mundane act of riding an e-scooter to the dignifying yet challenging work of being a young newsy in mid-20th century America, Nadir captures it all with a sense of sincerity and passion. He has created work for a long list of notable clients such as Michael Jackson, Drake, Dreamworks, and The New Yorker. With many of his works being permanent installations at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery and the National Museum of African American History and Culture, he has managed to uplift his people and share diverse depictions of them with millions of others.

    Kadir Nelson Quote: “I feel that art’s highest function is that of a mirror, reflecting the innermost beauty and divinity of the human spirit; and is most effective when it calls the viewer to remember one’s highest self. I choose subject matter that has emotional and spiritual resonance and focuses on the journey of the hero as it relates to the personal and collective stories of people.”

    Yehimi Cambron

    How Does She Tell Her Story?:

    She primarily creates mural paintings and mixed-media (usually digital art, woodcut, watercolor, and collage) artwork to celebrate the “humanity, resilience, and contributions of immigrants.” In an American society where immigrants are openly disparaged by its most important and powerful figure, Cambron’s art serves to create a different narrative where the humanity and dignity of immigrants is put front and center. Her work often combines powerful text related to the reality of being an immigrant and images of immigrants and their families. To combat disparaging comments and beliefs, Cambron urges all citizens to see immigrants and understand their story. You don’t often see positive depictions of immigrants—especially Hispanic immigrants—but Cambron’s work makes sure that you do.

    The Story I Want to Tell:

    As a young Black man in America, the specter of police brutality and racism in all its forms has haunted my dreams and ambitions for a long time. With violence and polarization becoming more severe, I worry about my safety and ability to succeed on a daily basis. With my artwork, I want to communicate a defiance against this fear and a sense of resilience through enjoyment of life and success. I have attended schools where I’ve been the only person of color in a classroom, competition, or club, so I want to empower other young people of color who might encounter exhausting levels of microaggressions every week. Your peers might not understand you, but I do. It’s okay to stand up for your rights and enjoy yourself.

Log in to reply.

Original Post
0 of 0 posts June 2018
Now